Archive for July, 2008

On Fannie Mae & Freddie Mac

nyt_housing_mb.gif

Given how lousy, depressed and out-and-out terrifying the housing market is, there’s a substantial amount of guilt attached to how much fun it was to do this piece for the Sunday New York Times. The article, in essence, suggests that the recently approved housing bill (designed to bail out Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac) is a wretched piece of legislation, but still necessary; Necessary insomuch as that it should be a precursor to ultimately liquidating the two mortgage giants over the long term and letting multiple smaller savings and loan businesses absorb their work.

This illustration was originally spec’d at 6.5″ x 8″ but was clearly, um, augmented. Big ups to Kim Bost at the Times for wrangling the crazy idea of re-working it to wind through the article itself. That’s thinking on your feet.

Included below are two other ideas I submitted before a direction was chosen.

fanniefreddie_oped02.gif

fanniefreddie_oped03.gif

Getting Shorties for New York Magazine

getshorties_mb.jpg

For those who are about as poorly versed as I am with the vernacular of hedge funds, brokerage firms and the language of modern finance, I learned this week that hedge funds don’t get along so well with big firms like Bear Sterns (R.I.P) and Lehman Brothers. This is primarily because hedge funds (which are smaller and in some respects quicker than the big guys) contributed in some small part to Bear Sterns’ bankruptcy earlier this year.

Now, Mr. Mad Money himself, James Cramer, is suggesting that the same fate could become of Lehman Brothers and its CEO Richard Fuld on roughly similar terms. He explains it in depth in New York Magazine this week and I simplified it in the pictorial warning sign above for the magazine.

Meet The Press Now

nymag_meetpress_mb.jpg

This spot was just completed for one of Kurt Andersen’s Imperial City articles in New York Magazine dissecting how television news media stands to evolve (or devolve depending on how you look at it) in the wake of Tim Russert’s untimely death. Andersen observes that the void that Russert’s balanced objectivity leaves behind is poised to be replaced with many more opinion-heavy commentators. Truth be told, he can explain it a helluva lot better than I can. That’s why he wrote it & I just made the picture. Additional sketches and proposals that were submitted are down here:

nymag_mtpn_s1.jpg

nymag_mtpn_s3.gif

nymag_mtpn_s2.gif